PENNI - The Mechanics, Dynamics and Systemics explained

'A penny saved is a penny earned'

Benjamin Franklin

There are three elements or ‘integrated aspects’ to a business, the Mechanics (the step by step processes and procedures of management, planning, organising and controlling), Dynamics (the leadership, motivation and anxieties of people and their relationships) and the Systemics (the whole working entirety; the undivided mass of totality that represents the business environment). These aspects are set out in the Pre-training, Self-Efficacy Assessment Matrix as three columns. The following guide if offered by way of explanation and use:

The Mechanics of Management

  • The 'Mechanics of Management' are the processes, mechanisms, methods, procedures and technicalities that make things work. These are the deeds, the hard tangible tasks that ensure the practical application of the method is being met.
  • Mechanical words include; standards, plans, strategies, tactics, brand, budgets, functions, house-keeping, production and reporting. 
Examples of mechanical words (please note that not all of these words appear in the assessment matrix)

Mechanics of Management Diagram

The Dynamics of Management

  • The 'Dynamics of Management' are the subtleties, the undercurrents and forces that determine mood, feelings and relationships people have with their working environment and customers. The dynamics are the day to day relationships, communications and interactions of people.
  • Dynamic words include, development, vision, anxiety, blame, fantasy, value, power, frustration, satisfy and stress are all words associated with dynamics. 
Examples of dynamic words (please note that not all of these words appear in the assessment matrix)

Dynamics of Management diagram

The Systemics of Management

  • The 'Systemics of Management' are the overarching context in which both the mechanics and dynamics take place. Systemic represents the whole business. When the system is performing as it should, the business is growing through customer satisfaction.
  • Mission, environment, task, outputs, people, waste, growth, solution, quality, measurable are all words associated with the system

 

 

 

Examples of systemic words (please note that not all of these words appear in the assessment matrix)

Systemics of Management Diagram

The three ‘Integrated Aspects of Business’ value scores: Worked Examples

The following worked examples provide an illustration of your perceived self-efficacy in each of the integrated aspects when rated against your chosen business words (this example is based on the fifteen word assessment). The scores from each word are set in a chart for ease of presentation. The final chart is the cumulative score: your Personal Value.

Mechanic Value Score:

Value score mechanic diagram

The above chart details the mechanical scores using these everyday mechanical words. This chart shows your assessment of your own efficacy within the context of your mechanical training needs. In this example, there are developmental opportunities in the use of the words 'Manager', 'HRD' and 'Operations', whilst there is perceived strength in the words 'Standard' and 'Leader'.

The overall Mechanic Value Score is:

56%

This is equivalent to the performance expectation of a middle manager 

Dynamic Value Score:

Value score systemic diagram

The above chart details the dynamic scores using the everyday dynamic words. This chart shows your assessment of your own efficacy within the context of your dynamic training needs. In this example, there are developmental opportunities in the use of the words 'Authority', 'Power' and 'Performance', whilst there is relative perceived strength and value in the words 'Frustration' and 'Anxiety'.

The overall Dynamic Value Score is:

36%

This is equivalent to the performance expectation of a front-line manager

Systemic Value Score:

Value score systemic diagram

This chart details the systemic words that are associated with the 'Holistic' view of the organisation. This chart shows your assessment of your own efficacy within the context of your systemic training needs. In this example, there are developmental opportunities in the use of the words 'Waste', 'Continual Improvement' and 'Job', whilst there is perceived strength and value in the words 'Quantity' and 'Quality'.

The overall Systemic Value Score is:

64%

This is equivalent to the performance expectation of a senior manager

Personal Value Score:

Personal Value Score diagram

This chart takes the overall Mechanic, Dynamic and Systemic scores and creates a mean score defined as Management Value. The combined scores then create your Personal Value score. In this example, there are developmental opportunities in the use of dynamic words, whilst there is perceived strength and value in the use of systemic words. Both Mechanical and Management value is perceived as slightly higher than the dynamic value and somewhat lower than Systemic value. By focusing on Dynamic value as a developmental opportunity, both Management and Mechanical value would be expected to improve. In other words, you perceive your highest efficacy in getting the big picture strategic view, you are also reasonably effective in process management and procedures. Your development need is in understanding relationships and underpinning culture.

The overall Personal Value Score is:

52%

This is equivalent to the performance expectation of a middle manager

(See PENNI - Understanding your value scores).